COVID-19


While many people with COVID-19 have mild or no symptoms, it is still possible that they could be infected and pass the disease to friends, family and loved ones. Meanwhile, others don’t know that they’ve been in close contact with someone with confirmed COVID-19.


Get Tested Now


Current Infection Tests

A viral test checks samples to find out if you are currently infected with COVID-19. The time it takes to process this test is 24-48 hours.
Whether you test positive or negative for COVID-19, you should take preventive measures to protect yourself and others.



Past Infection Tests

Antibody tests should not be used to diagnose a current COVID-19 infection, except in instances in which viral testing is delayed. An antibody test may not show if you have a current COVID-19 infection because it can take 1–3 weeks after infection for your body to make antibodies.



GET THE LATEST FROM THE CDC

The United States Center for Disease Control and Prevention has more information at a federal level about COVID-19 and our current pandemic. Click the link below to access the federal government’s information and resources.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Should I be tested for a current infection?
  • Can someone test negative and later test positive on a viral test for COVID-19?
  • Who is at increased risk for developing severe illness from COVID-19?
  • What is a novel coronavirus?
Should I be tested for a current infection?
Maybe; not everyone needs to be tested for COVID-19.
If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and want to get tested, call your healthcare provider first. Most people will have mild illness and can recover at home without medical care and may not need to be tested.
CDC has guidance for who should be tested, but decisions about testing are made by state and local health departments and healthcare providers.
You can also visit your state or local health department’s website to look for the latest local information on testing.
Can someone test negative and later test positive on a viral test for COVID-19?
Yes, it is possible. You may test negative if the sample was collected early in your infection and test positive later during this illness. You could also be exposed to COVID-19 after the test and get infected then. Even if you test negative, you still should take steps to protect yourself and others. See Testing for Current Infection for more information.
Who is at increased risk for developing severe illness from COVID-19?
People at increased risk include:
Pregnant people might also be at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19.
Long-standing systemic health and social inequities have put many people from racial and ethnic minority groups at increased risk of getting sick and dying from COVID-19.
In addition to those at increased risk, there are certain groups of people who require extra precautions during the pandemic.
What is a novel coronavirus?
A novel coronavirus is a new coronavirus that has not been previously identified. The virus causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is not the same as the coronaviruses that commonly circulate among humans and cause mild illness, like the common cold.

SAME DAY TESTING
   -Current COVID-19 Infections
   -Past Infections
   -Results in 24-48 Hours

Current Infection Tests

A viral test checks samples to find out if you are currently infected with COVID-19. The time it takes to process this test is 24-48 hours.
Whether you test positive or negative for COVID-19, you should take preventive measures to protect yourself and others.



Past Infection Tests

Antibody tests should not be used to diagnose a current COVID-19 infection, except in instances in which viral testing is delayed. An antibody test may not show if you have a current COVID-19 infection because it can take 1–3 weeks after infection for your body to make antibodies.



GET THE LATEST FROM THE CDC


The United States Center for Disease Control and Prevention has more information at a federal level about COVID-19 and our current pandemic. Click the link below to access the federal government’s information and resources.

Visit CDC.GOV

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Should I be tested for a current infection?
  • Can someone test negative and later test positive on a viral test for COVID-19?
  • Who is at increased risk for developing severe illness from COVID-19?
  • What is a novel coronavirus?
Should I be tested for a current infection?
Maybe; not everyone needs to be tested for COVID-19.
If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and want to get tested, call your healthcare provider first. Most people will have mild illness and can recover at home without medical care and may not need to be tested.
CDC has guidance for who should be tested, but decisions about testing are made by state and local health departments and healthcare providers.
You can also visit your state or local health department’s website to look for the latest local information on testing.
Can someone test negative and later test positive on a viral test for COVID-19?
Yes, it is possible. You may test negative if the sample was collected early in your infection and test positive later during this illness. You could also be exposed to COVID-19 after the test and get infected then. Even if you test negative, you still should take steps to protect yourself and others. See Testing for Current Infection for more information.
Who is at increased risk for developing severe illness from COVID-19?
People at increased risk include:
Pregnant people might also be at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19.
Long-standing systemic health and social inequities have put many people from racial and ethnic minority groups at increased risk of getting sick and dying from COVID-19.
In addition to those at increased risk, there are certain groups of people who require extra precautions during the pandemic.
What is a novel coronavirus?
A novel coronavirus is a new coronavirus that has not been previously identified. The virus causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is not the same as the coronaviruses that commonly circulate among humans and cause mild illness, like the common cold.


River Oaks Primary Care is dedicated to providing their patients health services that is of the highest possible quality.

River Oaks Primary Care is dedicated to providing their patients health services that is of the highest possible quality.